Christmas Pagan Festivals

The birth of Jesus didn't connect to pagan rituals in Jesus' lifetime, or even soon after he died. Early Christians didn't celebrate Jesus’ birth day. The account of Jesus’ birth is recorded in the gospel of Matthew and Luke and they were written around 100 A.D after Jesus' birth and don't mention the actual day of his birth. Celebration of birthdays was not a common practice in Israel, if it were so, the birthday of prophets, kings and patriarchs would be recorded in the bible and remembered.

Revelation18:4-5

And I heard another voice from heaven, saying, Come out of her, my people, that ye be not partakers of her sins, and that ye receive not of her plagues. 5 For her sins have reached unto heaven, and God hath remembered her iniquities.


In ancient Rome, the pagan people celebrated Saturnalia festival in respect of the Roman god Saturn on 25th-December: Hundreds of years before the birth of Christ. Saturn was the Roman god of agriculture, liberation and time and parties!, It was a time of feasting, role reversals, free speech, gift-giving and revelry (gender-bending sex, drinking, telling people off, trading gifts and doing whatever you want). People exchanged gifts, sang songs (carols) and decorated their homes with evergreen trees. December 25 was the winter solstice on the Roman calendar, the shortest day of the year. Saturnalia was a lawless, drunken time in Rome where literally anything was okay — this was the original Purge, in which laws were suspended for a brief stretch of time. There are many pagan holiday traditions connected to Christmas, including mistletoe, which symbolized fertility and new life during the Yuletide. Another winter-solstice festival, Yule, was observed by Germanic people who connected to Odin, king of the Norse gods. This pagan festival was also later wrapped up into Christmas: The Yule log, decorated tree, and wassailing can all be traced back to this Teutonic celebration. After solstice, the darkest night of the year, the renewal of light and the coming of the new year was celebrated in the later Roman Empire at the Dies Natalis of Sol Invictus, the “Birthday of the Unconquerable Sun (Tammuz),” on December 25.


The First Christmas (A.D)

The birth of Jesus didn't connect to pagan rituals in Jesus' lifetime, or even soon after he died. Early Christians didn't celebrate Jesus’ birth day. The account of Jesus’ birth is recorded in the gospel of Matthew and Luke and they were written around 100 A.D after Jesus' birth and don't mention the actual day of his birth. Celebration of birthdays was not a common practice in Israel, if it were so, the birthday of prophets, kings and patriarchs would be recorded in the bible and remembered. The first Christmas feast held on December 25 was in Rome in 336 A.D., after Christianity had become the Empire's official religion. The date was chosen as a way of superseding the winter solstice with a Christian celebration. (Solstice songs were transformed into early versions of the Christmas carols we sing today). By holding Christmas at the same time as traditional winter solstice festivals, church leaders increased the chances that Christmas would be popularly embraced, but gave up the ability to dictate how it was celebrated. By the middle Ages, Christianity had for the most part, replaced the pagan roman religion. On Christmas, believers attended church, then celebrated wildly in a drunken, carnival-like atmosphere similar to today’s Mardi Gras. Each year, a beggar would be crowned the “lord of misrule” and eager celebrants played the part of his subjects. The poor would go to the houses of the rich and demand their best food and drink. If owners failed to comply, their vi